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"Be the Change" Film and Speaker Series



Please join us for our next "Be the Change" program:

BE THE CHANGE: Stories of personal courage, resistance, and heroism CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center Presents

In observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day

"A World Erased" with Noah Lederman

Noah Lederman, the grandson of Holocaust survivors, had always wanted to hear his grandparents' stories. The stories, however, gave their own children nightmares. Thus tales of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and of the concentration camps were off limits to the third generation. Noah Lederman will speak about how he finally gained access to his grandparents' memories before they disappeared forever. Selected as one of the best books of the year by the Philadelphia Inquirer, Lederman's stories will transport audiences from his grandparents' kitchen table in Brooklyn to World War II Poland. Booklist had called A World Erased "a vital contribution to Holocaust collections."

Admission is free and open to the public. Donations are welcomed. For more information on this and other events, please call 812.234.7881.


 

Saturday, April 22, 2017
7:00pm EST

CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center
1532 South Third Street
Terre Haute, IN 47802

812.234.7881


Past Events:

Jordan is a 24-year-old humanitarian from California. Two days after his high school graduation, Jordan began his humanitarian efforts in the world’s newest country, South Sudan. Working alongside Sudanese Lost Boy, Deng Jongkuch, Jordan helped to build a medical clinic in Malek, South Sudan. Next, Jordan’s college professor of Arabic introduced him to the atrocities occurring in her home country of Syria. Although Jordan did not know a single person in Syria, the testimonies by his professor drew him to care. As a result, he founded Help4Refugees in 2012 and traveled to Jordan to find out how he could help the Syrian refugees in the Zaatari Refugee Camp. Since 2012, Jordan has been delivering prefabricated housing units, reporting as a freelance journalist, and helping others gain access to the camp. To learn more about Jordan’s humanitarian work, please go to Help4Refugees.org.

Admission is free and open to the public. For more information on this and other museum events, please call 812.234.7881.

This event is made possible in part by generous support from the Florence and Laurence Spungen Family Foundation.

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017
6:30pm EST

CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center
1532 South Third Street
Terre Haute, IN 47802

812.234.7881

Indiana State Community Semester and CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center present:

"Difficult Conversations: Teaching About Intolerance Past and Present"

Mary Johnson, Senior Historian, Facing History and Ourselves

Introduction by Isaac Land, Associate Professor of History, Indiana State University

Intolerance is a perennial topic in the classroom, in the media, and in civic life. A century of multiple genocides on multiple continents offers a bleak verdict; sometimes even current events can leave us despairing. What insights can the humanities and the social sciences bring to the table? How can historical examples and today’s headlines offer “teachable moments” in the classroom and community?

Mary Johnson is a senior historian at Facing History and Ourselves, an international educational and professional development organization that engages the community in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry.

Admission is free and open to the public. These events are made possible in part by generous support from the Florence and Laurence Spungen Family Foundation.

Saturday, January 28, 2017
7:00pm - 8:30pm EST

CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center
1532 South Third Street
Terre Haute, IN 47802

812.234.7881

"Ida Kersz: Hidden Child During the Holocaust"

In 1942, Nazis stormed into Ida's hometown in Poland. Her mother fled to a nearby building and jumped to her death, leaving behind her 3-year-old twins, Adam and Ida.

The two children led completely separate lives for five decades, until 1995, when Idawho was now living in Illinoissaw a picture of her long-lost brother in a Jewish publication. He was living in Poland and had a different name, but Kersz immediately recognized some of his physical features and contacted him.

Ida managed to bring him to Chicago that same year, then used childhood photos to convince U.S. immigration authorities that the man who had lived for so long as Jerzy Dolebski was in fact Adam Paluch, her brother.

Monday, November 14, 2016
6:30pm EST

CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center
1532 South Third Street
Terre Haute, IN  47802

812.234.7881

Admission is free and open to the public. This event is made possible in part by generous support of the Florence and Laurence Spungen Family Foundation.

"Even in Hell, There is Hope" with special guest Henry Oster

Henry Oster was a carefree kindergartner in Cologne, Germany, when Hitler and the Nazis seized power in 1933. For the next 12 years, Henry struggled to live while his family, his friends, and the Jews of Europe were overwhelmed by the Holocaust.

Henry hid his mother from the SS in an attic in the Lodz, Poland Ghetto. He escaped a firing squad in Auschwitz and endured a death march through the Polish winter. He formed a life-long friendship in the nightmare barracks of the Buchenwald concentration camp. He saw his friends killed by a British fighter-bomber and came within hours of starving to death before his liberation by General Patton's 3rd Army.

Henry rebuilt his life from nothing, arriving to the U.S. with no English, no money, and no education. And from the ashes of a ruined past he built a life full of love, joy, and compassion.

Saturday, August 27, 2016 
6:30pm EST

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The first annual Walter Sommers Lecture on Holocaust History

"Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing"  with Dr. James Waller

Dr. James Waller is the Cohen Professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Keene State College (NH), home to the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, one of the nation’s oldest Holocaust resource centers. He is a widely-recognized scholar and lecturer in the field of Holocaust and genocide studies and has also worked extensively on programs related to intergroup relations and prejudice. His latest book is titled Confronting Evil: Engaging Our Responsibility to Prevent Genocide. 

The Walter Sommers Lecture on Holocaust History is an annual program to honor CANDLES docent and supporter Walter Sommers for his untiring dedication to Holocaust education. 

Saturday, September 24, 2016
6:30pm EST

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